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NQTs forced into supply

News | Published in TES Newspaper on 19 September, 2008 | By: Irena Barker

It is not an ideal way to start a career, says GTC chief, and a third have dropped out

Just two-thirds of teachers who qualified last year are working as registered teachers, figures published today show. And the England’s General Teaching Council (GTC) suggests many are turning to supply teaching as a means of entering the job market.

Only 23,000 teachers out of the 34,700 who graduated from PGCE courses last year were working in state schools by the end of March this year, which means 34 per cent had dropped out. This represents a slight improvement on spring 2007, when 39 per cent of newly qualified teachers (NQTs) were not registered as working in schools.

But commentators say the drop-out rate is still too high and some teachers may be struggling to find work in either non-shortage subjects or primary schools.

Professor John Howson, of Education Data Surveys, recruitment analysts, said the GTC should gather more data on regional variations to identify where new teachers may be struggling to find work.

The GTC, which compiles the statistics every year, says some of the “missing” NQTs may have decided to delay the start of their careers, or be working in further or higher education or the independent sector, which do not require teachers to be registered.

The teaching body’s statistics show that although the number of supply teachers has fallen by 1,200 this year, the number of new teachers in supply has risen from around 2,500 to more than 2,700, and 1,680 teachers under 25 were working as supply teachers in March.

Keith Bartley, the GTC’s chief executive, said starting a career with supply work was not ideal.

“I do have concerns about the group of young, and therefore recently qualified and less experienced, teachers who are working in supply roles at the beginning of their careers,” he said.

“A good support network for new teachers’ professional development is greatly valued, and it is much better to maintain these networks in a consistent environment. I therefore believe that all NQTs should have the chance to complete their induction period in a substantive post.”

The Voice education union has long called for the Government to ensure induction places for new teachers, as happens in Scotland, but little progress has been made.

Sara Bubb, an induction specialist at the Institute of Education in London, thought most of the new teachers taking supply jobs would be in the primary sector: “There’s a dearth of jobs in primary schools outside London and the South East,” she said. “I know NQTs who have found themselves up against 100 others when applying for jobs.

“And I share Keith Bartley’s concern that supply is not the best way to complete an induction. Supply can only count towards the induction if it is for a term or more, and I wouldn’t have thought new teachers are taking supply out of choice.”

STAT’S A FACT

- 538,055 people are registered to teach, a 1 per cent rise on last year

- 9 per cent of registered teachers are from ethnic minorities

- 87 per cent of teachers registered are actually working as teachers

- 74 per cent of teachers are women

- 77 per cent of working newly qualified teachers are women

- 32 per cent of teachers are over 50

- There are 11,000 fewer teachers aged 45 to 59 than a year ago

- There are 10,000 more teachers under 45 than a year ago

- The number of supply teachers registered as working in schools has fallen by 1,200 in the past year

Source: GTC annual census, March 2008.


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Comment (39)

  • The reason why I'm doing supply work at the moment is because there are not enough ICT posts for NQTS within the area where I live to gain a position in a secondary school. Although I've searched in different areas, there seems to be a shortage. I can't afford financially to move down South or even move further North. Until I gain a full time, permanent post and I know the position is secure, only then I will consider to relocate if possible. I finished my PGCE last year but this particular subject area in schools is very limited. Therefore people go on supply. However, if I don't gain a position pretty soon, I will unforuntaely have to turn to other employment within industry. All the training I've done and achieved to be a teacher I feel then is a waste. I've had several interviews but schools seem to only be interested in either past PGCE students or only those who are finishing their last term off or more experienced teachers. Not the people who have finished everything and are on supply cover. TA's in some schools are being able to teach full time classes per day each week with no qualified teacher in with them. In this case it's fair to say that it is also these people who are stopping qualified teachers to be employed within a school. Simply because it is cheaper to pay a TA than take on a qualified teacher.

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    15:56
    19 September, 2008

    sonver

  • I Picked up on this story because I am in the process of applying for a PGCE, doesn't sound good. I just wanted to add something regarding the previous comment. TA's are used to cover the classes for up to 3 days in place of a supply teacher - however this is not down to the TA's themselves - LEA guidelines state this is ok and the decision is made by the head (more often then not as a cost cutting measure) - Ta's generally don't have a choice (I don't mean they are not willing to do it) I mean that if they say no they are labelled as not being team players. In the current situation of falling numbers on roles when cost cutting measures are made, the support staff are looked at first, so people are reluctant to say no to covering. I say this as a school governor who has had to abide by the head's decision to do this, because it's day to day running of the school and not under governor's remit to challenge. It's unfair to say TA's are preventing teacher's being employed, really it's heads and LEA guidelines that should shoulder the blame. I personally think that children deserve to be taught by qualified teachers, but if it is a short term measure (and I mean a day/few hours) children sometimes respond better to a known member of staff opposed to a supply teacher.

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    18:40
    19 September, 2008

    anon413

  • There are few proffessionals with less voice in education than us supply teachers. It may be worth remembering some of the wider positive influences of supply. I often meet teachers on supply who may have left a full time job for personal or whatever reason. They had become cynical and question wether this education business is worth bothering with. They then go on supply and re-discover what a great job this is. They start doing and giving schools great support. They then start looking for a full time job again. If they have done suppy for six months or more. They have gained the most fantastic on the job training and development which could never be matched by a thousand of those boring INSET days they attended when on contract. For the inexperienced teacher supply is again fantastic for developing realistic teaching skills. Yes without the support of a structured programme which from my experience was just filling in forms and gathering evidence. (exactly the same evidence I had provided on P.G.C.E.) Generally wasting the poor inexperienced teacher time and taking them away from quality - lesson planning and assessment/feed back. Supply teaching is the greatest teacher training out. What education job gets a teacher into so many different schools to see the good stratagies the good teaching the good systems in operation and the questionable for them to decide. I can feel a good school or a hopeless one as soon as I walk through the gates, I am as incisive as a lead OFSTED inspector when judging schools. I also like OFSTED as it not a pain to me I see it as a chance to show what I can do well. So narrow views of supply and opinions made so often without asking us! Please leaders look at the whole view and consult us as well!

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    11:06
    20 September, 2008

    geffone

  • Had to give up doing supply because I was an NQT who had used up all my 'supply teaching allowance' without getting the opportunity to start induction. I'm now working as a teaching assistant on low pay. The supply teaching agencies who signed me up weren't interested in finding me long-term work where I could start induction, instead preferring to have me at their disposal for doing day-to-day work. The TDA should stop encouraging so many people to train as teachers, particularly in primary and non-shortage secondary subjects. Starting your teaching career by doing supply is far from ideal!

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    14:29
    20 September, 2008

    Rockchick2112

  • 'geffone' is quite correct. Doing Supply gives great experience. But it is tough and demanding. I had several very experienced senior teachers tell me that no way could they take the heat of doing Supply round Yorkshire's 'Hell Highs'. And, to be honest, I needed the re-assurance of always being 'on the way home'. I used to fly in from my home in rural SE Asia after Easter to do the third term. I used to count up the teaching days, so, no matter how bad a day, I could leave the school saying "6 down, only 49 to go' or whatever. I would fly in again at the end of August and do half a term for a 'let down' school. Many times, I have looked round a staffroom at the drawn faces and though that I would have been in despair if I was facing ten full years in that school till I got to retirement. At that time (1999-2004), there was Supply work to be had as there was a shortage of teachers willing to teach in the 'sink' schools. More than half the country's qualified teachers had got out to something else. I remember that the figures were approximately 200,000 teachers needed, 400, 000 qualified, 180, 000 in post and 220,000 in the PIT (Pool of Inactive Teachers). I wonder what happens now. How many being laid off by Lehmann and HBOS, for instance, have a teaching qualification and will be visiting the Supply Agencies soon? Also,what will happen to school budgets? The tax take will shrink as unemployment grows and the Government will have less to spend on the public sector. Not a happy prospect..

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    16:30
    20 September, 2008

    Greatgranddad

  • I heard of a 200 applicants for 2 posts in a West Country school recently. I'm hoping to start a Primary PGCE next September in the same area, so my prospects don't look that good. Without knowing too much about it, I don't think I'd mind doing a bit of supply in order to get around and see a few different schools, but it seems unfair that NQTs have a supply allowance. Why is that??? As long as they're good at the job it shouldn't matter.

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    22:04
    20 September, 2008

    smell the glove

  • smell the glove is qutie correct. If a new teacher can hack the demands of supply work then why should it not count toward QTS. I learned more quicker about teaching on supply than I ever done as an NQT. So come on yes maybe two terms in one school and count another term if a requistite number of days done in different schools with agency are completed. Also does any of the leaders notice that all teachers end up covering other teachers lessons when staff are away. From my expereience as a PGCE or as an NQT this bit of the job was not addressed at all in anyway whatsoever by initial teacher training. Tick boxes for everything but that. Also if covering lessons was integrated into initial teacher training maybe the standard of cover work left and better continuity achieved as departments would find their cover work scrutinized instead of leaving the dross left for me to make something out of every day in school doing general cover. I am frustrated at the narrow mindedness of the leaders in that they do not address the fact that school life means that teachers and staff are absent and no effort whatsoever is put in to the infrastructure and no value put toward the people like me who have to paper over it all. Covering absent teachers work by supply be they NQT working towards QTS or with a little experience like me is valuable and relevant teaching experience. Maybe ask some teachers but I doubt anyone will I am exasperated when I see real quality ex PGCE on supply not getting counted some of their supply experience counting to their QTS. Its unfair narrow minded and does not fit at all with areas with fewer substansive posts. Anyway who cares but the likes of me who see it

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    22:48
    20 September, 2008

    geffone

  • I've been forced into supply work, due to only wanting to work part time. I qualified in July (Primary with MFL Specialism-Spanish). Schools don't seem interested in part time work or shall I say part time NQT, because it is very difficult to organise in the long run. I do fully understand that having 2 different class teachers could cause problems but as long as you work together and are consistent - I do not feel there will be huge problems. I am disheartened at the prospect of not finding part time work after the gruelling 9 months of qualifying - and I am saddened that flexible, family friendly work options are rare in Education. I want to be a mummy as well as a passionate teacher!!!

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    23:11
    20 September, 2008

    Zinnie

  • Really glad I saw this. I have started supply teaching but find that I don't have any support behind me and I am under pressure to go into school on day to day work and be 'fantastic' and know everything or they won't ask for me back. I'm scared it will knock my confidence, so I am thinking about working in a nursery I know well until I get a long term or permanent post. I have done a years PGCE and suddenly I have to go into schools with no support and deliver lessons to children I do't know, it just doesn't feel right!

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    10:05
    21 September, 2008

    Fee12

  • Obviously i have no idea where posters live, but many secondary schools are not employing NQTs because as SONVER points out, it is cheaper to employ support staff. In East Anglia and the Home Counties the majority of secondary scholls have teams of Cover Supervisors, line managed by a Senior Cover Supervisor , who are being used as" cheap teachers". NQTs are not even able to get jobs as supply teachers in many schools because the Heads prefer to recruit TAs; HLTAs; Cover Supervisors; Non-teaching Heads of Year etc. These willing folk are cheap and can be more easily manipulated and exploited by Heads. Why would a Head recruit an NQT he / she could employ Mrs Smith or Mr Jones on 6.50p an hour to do the job. There are thousands of NQTs out there who cannot find jobs, even as supply teachers and yet the government continues to spend 10s of thousands of pounds on TV adverts to recruit teachers. It's the education politics of the madhouse. Curly Shirley and Rock chick are also spot on. Why would anyone want to start their teaching career as a SUPPLY TEACHER, especially in an inner city school. As one supply teacher in Norwich said to me yesterday, " if i wanted to be a lion tamer, i would have joined a circus." It's a national scandal that Heads are recruiting cheap labour as teachers. When will parents get the message that their child's" new teacher" may not be a teacher at all but Mrs Smith from down the road on 6.50p an hour !

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    16:21
    21 September, 2008

    tonycallaghan

  • I have just finished my PGCE in July and am now an NQT and like so many other posters I cannot find a job either. I am one of the shortage subjects for secondary school, before I started the course I was assured there were jobs for me! However I am now applying to other home counties and parts of the country away from London for the simple fact that there are no jobs. I visited Australia over the summer - went into a teaching agency in Brisbane said I was a secondary teacher they had 60 jobs in one area alone and wanted to know when I could start teaching, if it was not for the NQT year I would be there now! I agree with Tony Callaghan - why do the government spend so much money advertising for teachers when there is no jobs for us once we qualify? I will stop ranting and continue the search for an NQT post...

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    17:56
    21 September, 2008

    frazzy

  • Have said enough and learnt something. The new CS role has made life harder for us supply teachers as its reduced the amount of work for mercenaries like me.Reading the posts I now think that the new CS role will seriously reduce the amount of posts for, just qualified teachers to do their NQT induction year. Now that is seriously not good for this proffession.I really have not thought of that and have to admit I only become a supply teacher after completing induction and gaining QTS as for lion taming I am seeing and hearing a lot more lions growling in classrooms on the corridor these days to tame. On the NQT issue, time for the leaders to get the stats out and find out the following question from sample schools in different areas. Question How many NQT's did your school take on in 2004 and how many did your school take on in 2008 ie has the CS role reduced taking on NQT's because its cheaper. Would be interesting to know - but sounds a bit simple- in teaching simple things are frowned upon. Just read the STATS a fact at the top again . Not much in the stats to tell us of the effect of the CS cover which has come in and wether it has affected induction. Loads of blurb from GTC about concerns about lack of induction placements and picking on us hapless supply teachers- but nothing about the effect of the CS role on induction

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    18:09
    21 September, 2008

    geffone

  • Just realised how foolish my previous posts are. The GTC can only publish stats on how many GTC card carrying teachers are on their books.The main aim of the GTC is as a disciplinary body to see if they need to withdraw membership so a teacher cannot teach if a tribunal goes against them. Bit like the GMC for the docs but, doc get paid more.As a CS does not have to be a card carrying GTC member then the CS cannot be brought before a GTC tribunal.Excellent stuff no disciplinary body for CS but off to the Jobcentre if a tribunal should go against a teacher I am a little unfair I do get a pamphlet from the GTC as well. Highly irked that i have to pay the GTC to do supply work as a QTS and read all this negative stuff as a supply teacher about my role by this lot. However I am voicelless and of no conseqence. I will really try to leave this thread alone know - however the blurb at the top really winds me up big time

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    20:18
    21 September, 2008

    geffone

  • I do agree with the second positing that Headteachers and the LEA's should take responsibility on where TA's should fit in and what their role is. In some schools TA's are used correctly but like everything in life some play by the book and some don't and unfortunately its those schools who do not employ TA's in a suitable way. On the other hand, although it is Heads who employ them within the school, the people who are TA's themselves surely must stop and think I am really allowed to teach full time classes of 30 children possibly each day or for 3 days on my own without having a qualified teacher iin the same class as them. (Even if a supply teacher has to be in with them. Their still qualified teachers, no different). I do see both sides because for many people it is a job at the end of the day. I suppose then it comes down to following the management route if you want anything sorting out. However this doesn't always work. Is the answer then that Heads, LEA's and even the Government need to be stricter on this and actually think about future prospects for teachers. I knew that when I finished Uni and my PGCE that a job wasn't going to just be there for me. I'd have to apply, go to interviews etc... like other people to get what I want. However other people on my course at the time were very lucky because they didn't have to apply in the same way as I've had to. Schools where they had done their placements took them back. Many schools within the area where I live do not advertise for my subject area very much at all. Therefore I have to look further a field. At the moment there is no supply work going on because its very slow. To find work then I think I'm going to have to go into industry for a while but keep applying for any teaching posts that come up. Its not just finance at the end of the day its also keeping yourselves motivated and active I suppose.

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    12:05
    22 September, 2008

    sonver

  • It's disappointing that things still seem to be the same. When i qualified in 2003, i was full of hope for getting a job. In actual fact, i really struggled to get offered any supply, but because i had done a bit, the 'clock started ticking'. So actually, i had done little supply, but was expected to get a job before the end of the supply limit. I was very lucky in that a half term turned up towards the end of my limit, which led to a mat leave, then another term's gap, then a temp to perm. I nearly left the profession. I used to be terrified at the thought of going into a classroom with no repertoire of experience to draw on. At my school, we can rarely afford to book supply because we have huge budget probs which nearly led to redundancy. I thought when i got permanent, i was safe. And if i ever hear another 'crying out for teachers' comment i will probably nut someone ;)

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    20:47
    22 September, 2008

    smilelikeyoumeanit

  • I agree with Zinnie above. I am so disappointed that there seems to be no desire to take on NQTs on a part-time basis, which is a shame. I was told that things were changing during my part- time PGCE, which took me eighteen months, because of my family commitments. A year later, I have come to the conclusion that despite all the talk of work-family balance, this is not the case for mature NQTs like myself. So, I have to carry on with supply work, which works well for my work-familly balance at the moment. I agree that the powers that be should, really, start thinking outside the box and address this issue, as well as the wealth of knowledge and experience supply work can give NQTs, hence, count toward their induction.

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    21:27
    22 September, 2008

    ugo

  • I worked as an engineer. I gave that up and went into teaching, qualifying in 2006 on the GTP program in Sheffield. It was tough, especially financially, but it's a job I have come to love. I teach physics. I am apparently a fantastic, creative teacher who gets excellent results with kids who have been destined to fail. My current school values my industrial experience, thinks I'm a breath of fresh of air, my exam scores are the best in the district and am currently head of department. I've even won awards for my teaching. There is a catch. I had to move to the USA to get a job! Seriously. I teach a shortage subject, or so I was lead to believe. And yet my first year after obtaining QTS was spent on supply. I have yet to complete my induction year. I couldn't find a school prepared to take me on. For whatever reason, I failed to secure a place at a school in the UK. One place even turned me down because I didn't SMILE enough in the interview! That was all they could find to criticise me on (or all they were prepared to comment on). I value every experience I have had in a classroom. And I know I have had a unique experience teaching in another country. However I would much rather have got a job teaching kids in a country I love. I know we have a fantastic education system in the UK. Without it I would not have achieved the things I have. I long to share my experiences with kids in the UK. Yet I can't help feeling like I was conned by those charged with promoting teaching as a career choice. Decades of quick fix, half hearted "directives" to solve both real and imaginary problems have brought our education system to this crisis, and it will take a brave and radical new approach to fix it.

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    3:09
    23 September, 2008

    smurfatik12

  • At last an article that actually begins to reflect what all of us supply/unemployed teachers have known for some time. Four years as an NQT in a shortage subject, is no joke. I have excellent references but the posts just are not there.

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    11:43
    23 September, 2008

    aveagojo

  • I finished my PGCE in June 2007. I am now a newly qualified teacher (NQT) like so many others and I have not been able to find my first full-time teaching position. My subject, ICT, is one of the shortage subjects for secondary schools, so they say. Meanwhile, before I started the course I was made to understand there were numerous jobs for qualified teachers.I have been forced to work as a Supply Teacher since June 2007 without any success in full-time positions. After attending many interviews in London and North Kent areas including the London Borough of Bexley, I can confirm that many secondary schools do not want to employ full-time staffs as they would prefer Supply Teachers to save themselves money and no commitment to staff development. It is about cost cutting and flexibility. The quality of children’s education is not seriously considered.If it was not for the NQT year requirement, I would have considered travelling to another country for my teaching career which I am passionate about. I totally agree with Tony Callaghan - why does the government spend so much money advertising for teachers when there are no jobs for us once we are qualified?

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    13:02
    23 September, 2008

    ramillies

  • This all sounds so familiar. I qualified as a history teacher through PGCE in 1982 and found it impossible to secure a permanent post. I registered as a supply teacher and survived six months in some very difficult schools in SE London. Economics demanded that I get a permanent job so I spent the next twenty plus years in the construction sector as a senior manager. Fast forward to 2007 when I took voluntary redundancy and had the financial backing to complete a return to teaching course. Throughout the course we were told that teachers were needed in all subjects. There seem to be very few posts apart from Teaching Assistants. Now I have registered to be a supply teacher, back to square one. I have enjoyed supply work and have gained a great deal from the experience, however, most people want permanent jobs when all is said and done. My teaching career seems to mirror government education policy, round in circles and getting nowhere fast. The number of teacher training recruits needs to be geared to actual demand. The state could save a fortune if the government planned effectively and stopped advertising for teachers that are apparently surplus to requirements.

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    15:02
    23 September, 2008

    philippage

  • I teach in Scotland, where I am able to complete my NQT year through supply work. I have found this to be incredibly worthwhile ; supply has given me experience teaching all age groups and allowed me to see how different schools do things, as well as giving me an idea of the type of school I would eventually like to work in. I do not believe this would be possible if I had obtained a permanent position straight after finishing my PGCE, and whilst I would obviously rather be permanently employed, I am trying to make the most of my current situation. I resent the terminology used above, namely that NQTs are being 'forced' into supply - whilst it is not an ideal situation and is a steep learning curve for anyone straight out of college, the ideas that doing supply is somehow secondary to class teaching and a lesser achievement are ones which, I feel, only seek to perpetrate the notions that teaching as a profession is in some sort of crisis and anyone without a permanent job has failed. It is important to be realistic here and acknowledge that teaching, like other professions, does not simply hand out jobs to all those qualified and that there is more than one way of gaining experience once away from the security of teaching college.

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    19:37
    23 September, 2008

    dandelion23

  • You guys have been saved by Gordon. In his speech to the party faithful today our Prime Minister said he had " charged Ed Balls with recruiting large numbers of Graduates to work in the blossoming Academies". So there you have it, the problems of NQTs solved in a flash.

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    19:40
    23 September, 2008

    tonycallaghan

  • I am a NQT who qualified as a secondary school teacher this August 2008. I, like many other NQTs in the Southampton area, have not been able to find employment to start this September However, the University of Southampton is advertising for people to train as teachers!!! This is, at best, irresponsible and, at worst, immoral - because people are giving up lucrative careers to re-train as teachers and are not getting employment. This is not only financially detrimental to these individuals but is also hitting the tax payer hard as the Government is giving bursaries. The universities need to get a certain amount of backsides on seats in order to get financial aid from the Government. However, there absolutely needs to be more control over the amount of teachers training - especially in non-shortage subjects!

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    11:11
    24 September, 2008

    slomas

  • Totally agree SLOMAS. I think you ought to send your views to a reporter at the TES. Your experience should be on the front page of the TES NEWSPAPER AS A FOLLOW UP TO THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE by Irena Barker. E- mail her irena.barker@tes.co.uk.

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    12:13
    24 September, 2008

    tonycallaghan

  • I am an NQT who qualified in June 2008 specialising in early years. The job situation in the North- East is, well basically non-existent. Supply work is very quiet too! I am registered but have not had any work yet. I did manage to get 1 interview for a rare position but because another person was more experienced I never got the job. Teaching is such a brilliant profession the rewards being totally immeasureable, but finding a temporary or permanent position as an NQT I feel is mission impossible! One other point I would like to raise is that I studied for 5 yrs to get here also bringing up one child it was not possible for me to work because of course demands and childcare. Prior to giving up a career I worked for 14 yrs and when I went to claim jobseekers allowance I was told I could not claim a penny. I now have to pay full council tax, where previously as a student I got 25% off and a training bursary to pay it. How am I meant to pay it now, Mr Brown with, no supply, no permanent jobs on the horizon and certainly no induction ?

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    Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    11:49
    25 September, 2008

    yumyumcandybilly

  • Yum Yum send your experience direct to the TES. Your dilema is repeated across the country. irena.barker@tes.co.uk

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    12:02
    25 September, 2008

    tonycallaghan

  • Hi tonycallagahn, thank you. I have done exactly that. The more people who are aware of crucial issues facing NQT's the better.

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    Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    12:34
    25 September, 2008

    yumyumcandybilly

  • i am an english teacher in a school in herts county and even though its a permanent post i am still taming lions and its like a circus. i am dealing with pupils who are racially prejudiced and at this point in time i have decided to go into supply teaching which would also allow me to spend more time with my own children. i am not sure if i'm doin the right thing . do you guys think i'm mad?

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    13:32
    25 September, 2008

    simlab

  • Problem is you may find it difficult to get supply work. I suggest you send your cv to a few 'good schools' and ask to be put on their books for supply. An agency can send you anywhere. Better to chose YOUR schools, then you will have a better idea of what you are letting yourself in for. Good Luck.

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    17:37
    25 September, 2008

    tonycallaghan

  • Its the same for FE teachers too - i just graduated from my PGDE in FE this summer, and have had no luck at all finding work, not even supply work.... hardly anyone from my PGDE has found work teaching their specialist subject, if anything at all. I am already considering my other options..eg I may have to get a job in a shop or a bar if Im to afford christmas for my daughter. I wish I had known this before I put myself through the stress of a PGDE course and all the assignments..now I have yet another pointless cerificate and nowhere to use my skills

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    19:44
    25 September, 2008

    2catz

  • Hi Tony, what do you mean by 'good schools'?

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    19:56
    25 September, 2008

    tanzeela

  • i retrained as a primary school teacher and finished my PGCE in July 2006. I am finally finishing my third term of my NQT year and hopefully will be fully accredited by this Christmas. This has taken far too long and my terms have all been in different schools. There has been no proper induction process because there has been no continuity. I am really lucky in my present school because I have a fantastic class and my colleagues are great. In between I was doing a lot of supply so I kept moving up the scale so was lucky to get this job as I am a relatively expensive NQT. Good luck to anyone who has recently qualified. It worked out for me so stick at it.

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    21:53
    25 September, 2008

    Irulan

  • I am NQT who graduated in 2003 I am only just doing my induction year I am now in my final term, I started doing supply work while looking for a full time teaching position. It was a great expereince for me but makes life very difficult. I am now getting closer to completeing my induction year which is great but I am still on temporary basis, there are very little permanet positions around anymore and it makes life very difficult. So I will be back applying for jobs this year and if there aren;t any back to supply work which I really do not want to do. I have come close several times to chucking the whole thing in but dont as I love teaching it's just a shame there has been no support for me and the many other teachers that have been in the same position. I'm now 28 and feel I'm just started on my teaching career althoug I have done a lot of supply work.

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    7:49
    26 September, 2008

    LucyJane

  • Lucy, please send details of your situation directly to the TES. irena.barker@tes.co.uk The more evidence the TES recieve the better to confirm the reality of getting a teaching job in 2008.

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    11:10
    26 September, 2008

    tonycallaghan

  • I completed my PGCE (Early Years) in 2006. I was told that having a specialist early years course would make me more desirable to schools looking for a FS/KS1 teacher. I was told that they were "crying out" for early years' teachers. Yet here i am over two years later still on supply. I've had only one serious long term teaching position (with the agency) teaching year three. An age i had no experience or knowledge of. I started my NQT, but was advised not to proceed and retract the application as this year group were extremly difficult and i would fail my first term. I did, in the hope i'd re-start my induction elsewhere. I didn't. My agency have said i've been with them for 4 terms and need to ask for an "extension" from my NQT rep. I don't know who that is (and neither do i). I'm confused, excaberbated and not even sure i want to be a teacher anymore! When i think about my career thus far, i have the mental image of a door slamming me in the face. I've applied for loads of jobs, but always come in second best. I'm either beaten by more experienced teachers or they are put off by my history of supply work. I'm considering leaving the profession, the stress is getting to me now. But other than working as a greatly over qualified TA, what can i do?

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    12:25
    8 January, 2009

    satehen

  • My agency found me one term post started this January. I didn’t sign any contract with agency to say this is a term contract they just told me. Now I started work as a Maths teacher and I am paid on a school payroll although I did not sign contract with the school. Now, the school is counting this term as my first term of NQT. I am about to finish my seven weeks so 5 week will be left but I don’t think the school is willing to pass me. Any ideas what will happen if I call the agency and tell them that I have problems and I cant complete this term. If I complete my first term of NQT in this school I will get a bad reference and bad report from the school that will not be good for my second school

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    23:45
    25 February, 2009

    Zakariya

  • Mysdsadasdasdasd

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    23:49
    25 February, 2009

    Zakariya

  • To Satehen
    You just need to write to your LEA and ask for an extension, it is quite easy, they will just send you a letter granting the extension so you will have longer to find a position. I had completed two terms of my nqt and needed an extension for this year, luckily I went to a school on supply, they liked me and asked me to apply for a vacancy as a general teacher (not teaching my specialist subject). I nearly bit their hands off because I had found it so difficult to find a job. I had started to feel really down about the situation and was also sick of being 2nd best at interviews. Anyway by xmas I will have completed my nqt and although I dont know how taking a general teaching position will affect me in the long term; at least I will not have this four term deadline hanging over me. Apply for an extension, keep at it, you may need to take something that is not your ideal job but once you have you nqt complete then you can breathe a sigh of relief. Good luck

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    23:37
    7 November, 2009

    jules k

  • Hopeless situation. I'm 24, I am an NQT and I have a year's experience as a supply teacher. Have lost count of how many applications I have done, tailoring them all to the school, including an executive summary and I've not had a single interview.

    Will sadly be forced to give up soon as myself and my partner are running out of money. No supply work where I live. Not able to claim Jobseeker's Allowance because my partner's a teacher and I am haven't got two year's worth of NI contributions... because I was training to teach!!! No-win situation.

    These people haven't left the career because they don't like it, or want to do something else, they've left because there are too many people applying for jobs. They don't stand a chance.

    I viewed a school with over 150 applications. Another small village school I applied to had over 100.

    Wrote to the Government advising them that there aren't enough NQTs being hired - they directed me to the Teacher Recruitment Service - which they ceased to operate a year ago.

    Out of date advice from the people who are supposed to be running this country.

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    15:49
    23 October, 2012

    edulou

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